bellway northwest

Discussion in 'Bellway Homes' started by uko987, Jun 26, 2014.

  1. uko987

    uko987 New Member

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    I bought one of bell ends sorry bellway houses in Widnes Cheshire two years ago.
    Thank god they are coming to the end of the development and soon they will be gone.
    the problem I have is that the road outside my property is meant to be getting blocked paved and raised to create a speed ramp. I have now heard a very strong rumour that the local council have told bellway not to block pave the road but to just tarmac it instead. And the reason for this is because the block paving is "high maintenance". it clearly shows on the plans that the road is meant to be block paved and raised with bollards on the corners. what I do find amusing is that bellway have block paved a road despite the plans showing tarmac but they are not going to do my area.
    What I would like to know;
    1, does a percentage of my purchase price of my house go into the construction of the roads.
    2, would I have a legal case against bellway.
    One thing I would like to add is that, when I moved in I was told by the then site manager the road would be blocked paved and raised. he also told every other house that lives on this junction the same thing.
     
    #1 uko987, Jun 26, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2014
  2. abbottswalk

    abbottswalk New Member

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    My understanding is it's the highway engineers at the county council who decide whether its of an adoptable standard for them to maintain. But that would normally be done at the planning stages and they would have been consulted at that point, and the approved plans would detail the surface treatments.

    That's not to say they might have changed their minds in the era of austerity!

    But I'd expect that the planning permission would need to be amended if the surface treatment were to be altered. They might try and get a "Non Material Amendment" but don't really think large surfaces in the public realm would qualify, so they'd have to do a new application, to which you could object. If they don't make an application and it's not what was specified plans in the grant of permission then you could raise an enforcement complaint.

    Guess the key is to find out what was originally approved and if any application has been made to change it.
     
  3. uko987

    uko987 New Member

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    the plans Cleary show a blocked paved road which is raised and bollards on the corners it is also in writing on the plans, they have not put any amendments on the planning section of the councils website with regards to the roads or the road surfacing. But one thing they have done is block paved a road on a different part of the development but this is shown on the plans as being tarmac.
     
  4. abbottswalk

    abbottswalk New Member

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    If it's not per the plans then it should be a planning enforcement issue. As it sounds like you're on a large development, you may find there is a specific Compliance officer allocated to monitor the site, might be worth talking to them. Assuming they're not hand in glove with the developers or just wanting an easy life in local government!
     
  5. NewHomeExpert

    NewHomeExpert Well-Known Member

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    Block paving is noisier than tarmac.
    The gaps between the paving fill with dirt then weeds and moss.
    The block paving gets blackend with tyres, oil and the dirty air diesel soot.
    Finally, if ever the road needs to be taken up, the paving never relaid as well as it was first time.
    So all in all, tarmac is cheaper and better in my opinion.

    To answer your questions:
    1) Yes a proportion of the purchase price is included for the estate roads, footpaths. open spaces, street light, signage, and social housing.
    In the same way it is for the Site Manager's wages and car and the house builder's profits and CEO bonuses.
    They charge buyers the highest market value price they can get for new homes, regardless of the cost of the associated infrastructure for each development.
    2) You have NO case against Bellway, unless the block paved areas are privately-owned by homeowners (shared drives and the like) . You have not bought and were not sold the adoptable roads.

    The roadway would be raised because block paving requires a 50mm sand bed and a 90mm block (total 140mm) whereas a tarmac road just gets a 25-35mm wearing course added on completion.

    The speed ramp is a good idea as it slows traffic down (or is supposed to). But tarmac "table tops" are very noisy if you live nearby.
     

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